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PARP INHIBITION

THE PIONEERING POTENTIAL OF NIRAPARIB, OUR PARP INHIBITOR, AS MONOTHERAPY AND IN COMBINATIONS

Image of a large molecule interacting with a DNA strand

 

The PARP family of proteins are involved in many functions in a cell, including DNA repair, gene expression, cell cycle control, and energy metabolism. PARP proteins play key roles in single strand break repair through the base excision repair pathway. Niraparib is being investigated both as a monotherapy against tumors with and without existing DNA repair defects and as combination therapy with anti-cancer agents that induce DNA damage.1

We’re investigating the potential of niraparib in monotherapy and in novel combination therapies against ovarian cancer tumors regardless of the tumor's sensitivity or resistance to prior platinum-based chemotherapy across different lines of treatment. In addition, niraparib is currently being investigated as monotherapy and in combination with other mechanisms of action across various tumor types.


References: 1. Morales JC, Li L, Fattah FJ, et al. Review of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) mechanisms of action and rationale for targeting in cancer and other diseases. Crit Rev Eukaryot Gene Expr. 2014;24(1):15-28.